Once you’re ready to start home buying, it’s offer time. Here’s where you’ll thank yourself for working with a real estate agent. They’ll help you determine the right offer to make for a particular house, including things that go beyond the dollar amount. For instance, offering an accelerated closing date or to buy and lease back to the buyer if they can’t move right away may be a smart move in some situations. When you make an offer on a house, the seller may accept it or counter-offer, and then your agent will help you decide how and if to negotiate. Once you arrive at a deal everyone likes, you’re considered under contract to buy the house.

My tip – STICK TO YOUR PRICE RANGE! We looked at 10 houses in our price range and one house just north of our price range. Of course – the more expensive house looked better. We fell in love with it and we stretched our budget to afford it! We didn’t have a chance to view any other prices in that higher price range either so didn’t know if our offer was too high (it was in hindsight). Just a tip!
Buying a home is one of the biggest financial decisions you’ll make in your life — and one of the largest sources of stress for many first-time buyers is the financing process. Unless you’ve done a ton of research, getting a mortgage can feel confusing or even a bit overwhelming. The good news is you can have a smoother and less stressful experience by avoiding these common mistakes:

Paperwork forms the most critical steps of closing a property deal. Despite there being a heap of papers filled with complex legal terms and jargon, it is highly recommended to read it yourself. In case you don’t understand certain terms or portions, one can look up for explanation on the Internet or consult a real estate attorney. Although you may feel pressured by the people who are waiting for you to sign your papers - like the notary or the mortgage lender - read each page carefully as the fine print will have a major impact on your finances and your life for years to come. In particular, make sure the interest rate is correct and all other agreed terms, like no prepayment penalty, is clearly mentioned. More generally, compare your closing costs to the good faith estimate you were given at the beginning of the process and throw a fit about any fees that may appear off.
Further prepare by taking advantage of a first-time homebuyer education course, often offered by local Realtors’ offices, banks or even your county at a community center. Many courses stress the importance of financial preparedness and getting ready to go through the rest of the home purchase process, and a class will help you get ready for what’s ahead.
Like any other loan, a cosigner on a mortgage means that the person is binding himself to be legally obligated to make the debt payments should you default. So, if you have your mom cosign on your mortgage and you default, she’s on the hook legally and will have to make payments. Similarly, if she wants to get off your mortgage, she can’t do so without you refinancing. If a cosigner is required, the lender is effectively saying that your financial history isn’t good enough and they want someone else to be on the hook, too.
Pre-approval is yet another option that is available. For pre-approval a credit check is run and the amount of available down payment is taken into consideration. The lender also looks at any owed debt and even if the person is a first time home buyer. This results in an estimated pre-approved amount that is typically favored over pre-qualification.
When it’s over—which could take a few hours, so plan on taking the day off from work—you’re a homeowner. Depending on your agreement, you might get the keys and be able to move in that day. Certain counties won't let you move in until the title's been recorded with the local government, which can take a few days, but your Realtor should know that law and brief you beforehand, if that's the case.
Note that if our home buyers had saved $60,000 for the down payment, their monthly bill would drop to some $1,600, eliminating the need for mortgage insurance. But in our model, mortgage insurance accounts for just $1,356 annually over 6.5 years in the $60,000-down-payment case -- or $8,800 total. Turns out that's a lot less than saving the additional $30,000 to hit the 20% down-payment mark. And so, if savings are an issue, first-time buyers might take on the insurance in exchange for a lower down payment.
Your agent will send listings to your cellphone. You'll also pick up House For Sale magazines and read classified ads in your local newspapers. You'll probably spend an inordinate amount of time surfing the Internet for homes. You might even plan afternoon drives to preview neighborhoods. Those are all excellent ways to see what's available. Here are some tools to help you narrow your home buying search.
Qualifying for a loan isn’t a guarantee your loan will eventually be funded: Underwriting guidelines shift, lender risk-analysis changes and investor markets can alter. “I have had clients who signed loan and escrow documents, and 24 to 48 hours before they were supposed to close were notified the lender froze funding on their loan program,” says Recchia. Having a second lender that has already qualified you for a mortgage gives you an alternate way to keep the process on, or close to, schedule
Once the property enters escrow, the purchase should be contingent upon it passing a home inspection. Once your offer is accepted, arrange to have an inspector visit the property and identify anything that needs to be fixed. Both you and the seller should receive a copy of the inspection report, after which you can renegotiate with the seller in case anything needs to be fixed. In worst cases, the contingency also protects you in the event that you would like to withdraw your offer.
Having bad credit is not an uncommon problem for Americans, and it should not discourage you from the home buying process. Saving up for a larger down payment of 20 percent or more will be required with anyone with a credit score below 580, to help demonstrate that you will be able to manage a mortgage. Those with a credit score above 580 can qualify for a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan, with a down payment requirement of 3.5 percent. Home buyers can also consider taking out a private loan, but should be prepared to pay high fees and interest rates. Finally, taking out a conventional loan is still possible if you are able to demonstrate financial stability, and that you will be able to manage mortgage payments.
Let the serious shopping begin! By now you’ve talked things over with your agent and you both know what you really want and need in a home. Armed with this, your price range and knowledge of the local area, look at listings online and with your agent, who will come up with properties for you to tour. Chances are you’ll discover some new things to love or hate about homes and refine your search.
Paranoid buys are sometimes difficult to work with. They may not believe the price is an accurate assessment of the house's market value. They'll submit low-ball offers and then show frustration when they are consistently rejected. Paranoid buyers don't trust real-estate agents, and may even try to buy their home without an agent, which is generally an unwise choice.
Minneapolis-St. Paul scores high for its flourishing job market and quality of life, but the area increases its appeal with a low cost of living. The Twin Cities have a median home value of $223,995, according to Zillow, which is slightly over the national average at $211,731. But residents still only pay 25.71 percent of the blended annual household income toward housing and utilities.
Being under contract means you can still back out if you learn anything unexpected about the house. And a home inspector is the one who finds any potential surprises. It’ll cost around $300 to $500 for your home inspection, but it’s well worth saving you from buying a house with a major problem. Your agent can often help you find an inspector, or you can go through the American Society of Home Inspectors.
Many renters think they can’t afford to buy a house because they haven’t saved enough to pay a 20 percent down payment. But you might be surprised to see what kind of house you could potentially buy based on the amount you spend every month on rent. Try plugging some numbers into an affordability calculator to get a better sense of what you need — and how much you have. Or, you can talk to a lender and find out what you might qualify for.

Next, decide which mortgage makes the most sense for you. There are plenty of different options to consider. Although Gilmour advises choosing one of the most common two: a fixed-rate mortgage, in which your interest rate remains steady for the duration of the loan, or an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), in which your rate fluctuates to reflect market changes.
The largest metro area to make the Best Affordable Places to Live list, Houston residents spend 26.47 percent of the median blended household income on housing. The Texas metro area also sees a relatively low cost of living despite the significant number of people moving there. Houston's population grew by 6.84 percent between 2011 and 2015 due to net migration alone, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Before submitting a purchase offer, request the energy bills from the past 12 months to get an idea of the average monthly cost, suggests Marianne Cusato, an award-winning designer based in Miami, Fla., and co-author of "The Just Right Home." Most utility companies can provide a homeowner copies upon request. “If you are in love with a house and everything else works but the energy bills, have an audit preformed to assess what your options are for making it more energy efficient,” says Cusato. “In many cities the electric company will come out and do the assessment for free.”
You can find for-sale properties through listing websites, local publications and your real estate agent. Start touring homes to develop a sense of what you want and don’t want in your home, as well as what type of inventory is available in your desired neighborhood. Once you find a property that meets your needs, work with your agent to negotiate a fair price with the seller.

Once you’ve made sure the property is in the agreed-upon condition, you’ll set a date to meet with the required parties. Different areas have different requirements as to who must be present, so you might meet one or all of the following: the escrow or closing agent, the attorney — who could also be the escrow agent, someone from the title company, the mortgage lender, and the real estate agents.
×